Sup

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About Sup

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    Ranger School Dropout
  1. New picture: I love the ground. I also really want to see the trees after you guys have had time to finalize things. Right now it's kind an awkward green fill that shadows painfully and LODs even worse, but things like that are definitely temporary this early on, so I'll reserve judgement. That one, lower shrub/tree on the right looks nice, at least. Keep it up, BFS, it's nice to see a solid variety of teasers from you guys. Quick edit: I agree about next gen art, by the way. I would love to see you go away from Normal maps and Bloom and everything altogether and give nice, old fashioned textures and gigantic billboard trees. Don't suppose that could happen in this market, but traditional artistry is always cool.
  2. Heh, we actually seem to have similar viewpoints on a lot of things, regarding games. I still think my statement about the reasoning is mostly right. From what I see of the game industry (almost exclusively artists,) most of the great talent would overall prefer to work on console games. I see that as being primarily a consequence of the recent stagnation of the PC 'industry' (if you want to segregate it that much,) and primarily the cause of such great artistry on the console side of things. Still, you make a good point, and I could certainly be wrong.
  3. I'm not saying this is right for BFS's game, exactly, but did anyone here play Operation Flashpoint Resistance? They took a completely linear campaign, and tacked on persistent men and equipment. You had a certain amount of soldiers, and a certain amount of weapons (at first, just a couple of cheap AK knockoffs,) and everything that left the mission with you (living soldiers/equipment carried on person or in vehicles) was added to your pool for the next mission. Gave a really strong sense of realism to the campaign (since, obviously, it was focusing on an underequipped resistance movement.) I don't imagine whatever unit you guys have in mind scrounges for weapons off of Russian soldiers, but the overall idea may still be something to keep in mind, from a design perspective (and at the very least is cool enough to warrant a look at ofp:r)
  4. I think RSE keeps that engine completely in house. And it does, in fact, support most of that. Unless they switched over when I wasn't paying attention, an updated/evolved version of that is what's running GRAW2's multiplayer.
  5. Hah, nice to see more people with that mentality. Not my personal stance (although art is definitely a lot more important than plenty of gameplay people claim,) but good for future job security. Anyway, it seems BFS has that covered. Not every asset (so far) is perfect quality, but it's got a clean, professional overall look.
  6. I agree entirely, but would like to see it approached from a very un-norg point of view. I don't think there is anything wrong with the NORG idea in this case, but I still think the best approach is a purely artistic thing. We're looking for the feeling of life; let's overstate the 'lived in' feel a bit.
  7. Excellent, exactly what I hoped to hear. Now I can look at the screenshot and see a solid pathfinding and ai system in the works, instead of just wall textures I don't quite like. Thanks for your patience, Hatchetforce.
  8. I know, of course, that temporary assets will be replaced and refined. This is, as you said, the way it always works. What I mean by 'posed models' is exactly what I said. 3d models, posed, placed static (or, maybe, running single animations) inside of your engine for the purpose of the screenshot presentation. The alternative, of course, is that this is a player or ai controlled entity actually acting, which you guys have taken a screen capture of. I'm just looking for clarification to distinguish between the terms realtime, in engine, in game, and gameplay, all four of which often get used incorrectly (or at least uncleanly) in all kinds of situations. I think what John said clears it up, and I admit in my hastiness I missed it my first time reading through, but I would still appreciate further clarification.
  9. EVERYTHING seen so far is in the engine. When just a model is shown it is taken in engine in a blank test map. Anything that is a screen shot is an actual screen shot from a running game. I do use a free roaming camera though to take interesting shots. Nothing you see is pre-rendered or not taken in real time. -John But is this actually in game, and thereby indicative of gameplay elements already in place, or just a screengrab with a couple of posed models for a concept pitch?
  10. SH4 looks cool. I'll buy it eventually, probably when I have a better computer.
  11. As expected. I didn't really like Killzone1 too much, but the art direction (and quality) was pretty solid. Interested in seeing what they manage to come up with, at least. Kotaku link, for a slightly different take: http://kotaku.com/gaming/ps3/gdc07-we-saw-...ight-242405.php (LittleBigPlanet, relatedly, looks amazing; would you guys mind me opening a topic on it?)
  12. Interesting. Good to see someone as big as Microsoft openly backing the episodic format. Hopefully it goes well, only Sam and Max has really nailed the idea so far.
  13. ouch, upper wall and goggle textures. So, are we looking at gameplay or just two posed models? Shadowing on the background guy's face looks great, is that from the lighting engine? Seems too 'jaggy' to be baked on the texture.
  14. Well thats highly subjective and I completely disagree. If you go to gamerankings.com, and check out the various reviews of eg F.E.A.R. and Condemned, you would see that lighting is generally praised by the reviewers. (btw, doom 3 was praised for it too you know.) Sharp, black shadows are never going to be conducive to anything but sharp, grey environments. This is actually a recognized fact in art, that's just usually painfully accepted in videogame art because everyone (except the artists) thought it made for a NEXT GEN look.
  15. Max isn't really the best choice, nor is it the industry standard. Almost everyone uses a dedicated mapping tool of some sort or another, like UE and Hammer are. Just as difficult to learn as max, of course, but an awful lot more appropriate for the task of mapping.