Dark Ranger

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About Dark Ranger

  • Rank
    Wannabee
  • Birthday 09/27/1982

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    Male
  • Location
    The Northern Hemisphere

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    PC gamer

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  1. @ Relinquish: I'm going to believe you were not sober when you posted that link. We'll leave it at that. Regardless, my darned curiosity got the better of me. @ Grendel: See you tomorrow! Currently playing: Come As You Are - Mindy Abair
  2. Confirmed--workaround resolves the issue. I used the same methodology and the same four browsers. No 403. Aldous: thanks. Your title serves you well.
  3. I'll chime in here: I can consistently replicate the issue using the following browsers: Opera 9.63 Chrome 1.0.154.43 Firefox 3.0.5 IE 7.0.5730.13 Methodology: - Clear full cache - Close browser - Open browser, navigate to BFS home page - Click Community > Blackfoot Studios Forum - Authenticate via the Log In link below the board header Shows the "You are now logged in as...Please wait while we transfer you..." and then displays the 403. System: XP Pro SP3 32-bit
  4. From my home to Universal Studios: Walking: 48.6 mi (78.2 km) - 15 hours 49 minutes Driving: 49.3 mi (79.3 km) - about 56 minutes
  5. I'll bite. [image removed] Although I'd take a subtropical climate over a continental/subarctic climate hands down, I do miss the snow and cold every once in awhile. For about a week. Then I want my beach back.
  6. A quality martial arts dojo/academy/gym will not typically be a belt factory. You learn more than just how to break arms and necks. While every student should understand the need for restraint within the dojo, the street is an entirely different matter. Rules go out the window on both sides. Instinct and skill will be tested, while endurance and calculation need to surpass that of your attacker(s). Style nuances are thrown aside, as it really comes down to what works and what does not in that particular scenario. Your instructor can provide all the tools and guidance in the world, but you have to learn and apply. Consider a student who walks into the dojo with a low "instinct to fight". Part of that, I believe, is because they lack the skills and confidence to deal with a situation. However, the term "instinct to fight" is probably different from what you actually meant. I have seen folks walk in with the "instinct to fight", and most of them have left when they realized that uncontrolled aggression and bullying were not condoned. However, I have seen countless students, previously deemed "passive and non-confrontational", develop a healthy confidence to deal effectively with a problem. The martial arts are a way of life, not a license to kill people. A student will discover that overcoming an attacker has less to do with his inherent level of aggression, and more to do with flexibility (mind and body), astute observation, good judgment, and lots of training. That is exactly what you should do--run. The whole point of self-defense is to equip an individual with the necessary skills to fend off an attacker, if required. In all cases, you should first try to escape and evade. Use the environment to your advantage. If, and only if you cannot retreat, then you defend yourself with lethal and non-lethal techniques. There are unknown variables in every street fight, and sometimes you cannot solve the equation through the conventional methods. Adapt and overcome.
  7. As a Floridian, I know exactly what you all are experiencing. My thoughts and prayers are with those affected by this storm. I have followed Ike since Day 1. Although my recollection is now a bit eerie, I remember glancing over the 2008 storm names at the beginning of the season. I distinctly recall my prediction that Ike would be a major hurricane, well before Arthur ever formed. I now wish I had been wrong. Stay safe.
  8. I closed the tab after 20 seconds. That said, I'm honestly surprised at some of the comments in this thread. I thought BFS forum members were known for their mutual respect and mature perspectives...
  9. I found a rather entertaining video about Ninjutsu. It gives some basic history and highlights several interesting techniques. While I won't provide the direct links, due to DMCA, I will give you the site link to YouTube. I suggest you search for human weapon ninjutsu part 1. There are five parts in total. I realize we are all mature individuals here. However, as a disclaimer, please do not try any of these techniques at home. These men and women have years of training behind them and perform these exercises in a supervised environment. Without getting too deep, my viewpoint of firearms is this: firearms are tools--weapons--for specific tasks. New technology should provide both a greater ease of use and better efficiency at the respective task. In the case of a firearm, we can injure or kill something from a greater distance and with better precision. However, each weapon has an optimal range. While a firearm can certainly "reach out and touch someone", it isn't necessarily a replacement for a knife. Each has their purpose and should be respected. In other words, I don't think it's wise to put your complete faith in one particular weapon. While a firearm in the hands of a trained professional can certainly be lethal, it's always good to have a backup plan if the gun does not fire. Empty hand or other weapons training is a good idea.
  10. My study of Shotokan was exclusive; our dojo did not offer any other programs. It was very traditional. The other disciplines I mentioned were available through one academy. This was possible because 1) the building was basically open 16/7, and 2) we had quite a few instructors. The core curriculum was extensive already, but there were many other opportunities such as the Italian Rapier, Jiu-Jitsu, kickboxing, and Tai Chi. Because of the diversity, we'd have alot of folks show up for only one particular style, or even a mix-and-match of several. Unfortunately, Ninjutsu is one martial art I'm not very familiar with. I know some very basic history. You have me intrigued, so I might have to do some research on that one. Never too old to start. I absolutely agree that the martial arts can be "a superior way of fitness." You learn about your body in ways that traditional resistance/aerobic training might not provide. As for joining up, stretching can be a big plus. Get your body used to some basic physical stress and start to ramp up your cardio training. You will be able to concentrate on the material without feeling as if you're going to die on the first day! I'd love to get back into martial arts. If I can find a quality place to train, my desire would be to study Krav Maga. I find it immensely fascinating. Otherwise, it would be just Kali this time.
  11. Martial arts became a lifestyle for me during high school and well into my twenties. I studied for eight years until circumstances prevented me from training regularly. I started with two days per week, for two hours each. When I stopped training, my schedule was five or six days per week, and three to six hours each day. I miss it and hope to resume training in the future, although not at the intensity I did before. I began with Shotokan exclusively. It was a great starting point for me, but I wanted more. Seek, and ye shall find. From that point forward, I studied Kali/Escrima, Silat (Maphilindo, Penjak, Mande Muda), Muay Thai (Boxing, Krabri-Krabrong), and the late Bruce Lee's fighting methods and philosophy (Jun Fan/Jeet Kune Do). I also had the opportunity to train with the Italian Rapier in the "Western Martial Arts" wing of the academy. I state the above as purely factual and without arrogance. While Kali, Muay Thai, and Jun Fan/JKD were the main curriculum, I dabbled in other areas, such as the American Bando system, Dhanda Yoga, and traditional kickboxing. Without a doubt, both Kali and Muay Thai were my favorite. I was very fortunate to be part of an amazing group of students and instructors. Our academy was different than most. I also had some of the best (and worst!) times of my life in that place. If you are considering martial arts, I would suggest you examine your reasons. I say this respectfully. Don't train to be lethal just because you can. Don't train to impress anyone. Don't train to become a bully. Rather, study the art for the sake of the art. Study to become a better person. Train hard so that you can defend yourself and your family, if need be. Somewhere, along the way, you will realize how far you have come: physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually.
  12. Dude, you have to stop posting these images. I'm getting flashbacks like you wouldn't believe. Some of my best memories, in the virtual world, originate from the R6/RS series. Looks like it's time to reinstall, conjure the magic, and play like it's 1998.
  13. Would you survive? House Cat: 100% Chance Racoon: 100% Chance Coyote: 100% Chance Medium Sized Dog: 100% Chance Large Dog: 100% Chance Wolf: 90% Chance Small Shark: 78% Chance Large Shark: 60% Chance Predetory Cat: 78% Chance Elephant 67% Chance Lion or Tiger: 71% Chance Bear: 60% Chance Alligator: 49% Chance Gorilla: 52% Chance Human: 71% Chance I'll take any of those, but please keep the sharks and alligators away from me. Seriously.
  14. Absolutely fantastic. This episode hit me hard, but to see those Marines in full dress, the flags waving proudly, and shared tears between brothers...I was overcome with emotion. This man gave much for his country, his family. This reward is richly deserved. My deepest thanks to all of those involved in this project. Thank you for sharing this, Cpl Ledanek.