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Psychomorph

Building PC

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No network expert. But one thing I notice under "Wireless LAN adapter Wireless Network Connection" is that on the left it says: "192.168.0.1", while on the right it says: "192.168.1.1". You're aware of that?

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No network expert. But one thing I notice under "Wireless LAN adapter Wireless Network Connection" is that on the left it says: "192.168.0.1", while on the right it says: "192.168.1.1". You're aware of that?

192.168.1.1 is the IP of the WLAN modem I use now (left prompt), 192.168.0.1 is the IP of the new router (right prompt).

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192.168.0.1 means there is NO ISP or local Network. Its a ping back address only to the physical hardware.

 

You should have an IP along something LIKE: 192.168.1.100 or 192.168.100.1 or other..there are laots of variables dependant on the Router used. looking at the right image You should have an IP like 192.168.1.50.

 

Possible reasons:

1> Power everything down, PC, Router & Modem then repower up in sequence waiting till is FULLY powered Modem, then Router then PC.

...this will ensure that any DHCP & IP assignments in place are cascaded. Do a cmd/ipconfig/all again & check the IP addresses

 

2> Connect the Modem directly to the PC power down then reboot in sequence. If you now have an IP without the router inplace the problem lies with the router

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192.168.0.1 is the IP of the new router (left), as I type it in the browser and can change the router settings with the laptop.

The old modem had the IP 192.168.1.1 (right), same deal, I type it into the browser and can access the modem settings.

 

The router (left) recognizes the IP's of the PC (192.168.1.101, that IP can be seen at the left at IPv4 Adress) and the laptop (192.168.1.100). When I access the routers settings page with the laptop I can see the IP's and computer names of both computers, the PC and laptop.

The old modem recognized (and still does) the PC under the IP 192.168.1.50 (which also can be seen at IPv4 Address at the right propmt).

 

I don't understand what's wrong with the IP's there. The router/modem hardware configuration seems fine, because my laptop works fine with it (and the guy who installed it tested it with his laptop too, both LAN and WLAN).

 

 

I will try to reset the hardware and try again.

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http://compnetworking.about.com/od/routers/g/192_168_0_1_def.htm

 

 

...apologies I stand corrected but its also the DEFAULT Windows IP. Try it disconnect all ables from the PC & Reboot then check Ipconfig...the IP will be 192.168.0.1 ....its the ping back address.

 

Bloody stupid idea for router manufactureres to use the same IP ?!?!?!

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Possible reasons:

1> Power everything down, PC, Router & Modem then repower up in sequence waiting till is FULLY powered Modem, then Router then PC.

...this will ensure that any DHCP & IP assignments in place are cascaded. Do a cmd/ipconfig/all again & check the IP addresses

I did that and same result. ipconfig/all has the same values as before.

 

I didn't try the LAN cable, because the PC is in another room, but I guess I have no other option as to drag there and set it up near the router.

If the modem/router were the problem, wouldn't the other two laptops have shown misbehaviour? I'm sure the problem lies within my pathetic attempt of a PC self build. <_<

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Psycho if you go to your modem's settings page and look between the Wi-Fi settings is there an option that allows you to change the channel number? If so try a different channel and see if that makes a difference.

 

Maybe you could post a screenshot of both your Windows and modem's Wi-Fi settings so we could compare the two.

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Is anything working on the new router?! If yes ie: laptop then look at the AVANCED configuration for the wireless cards on bot the PC vs laptop.

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I can't see where the problem lies. I put the PC to the same room as the modem/router, and internet works perfectly, I put it back to the other room and no internet connection (also can't access router). The laptop has normal connection from any room.

 

With the previous provider's modem I have connection with any PC/laptop in any room.

 

It doesn't make sense. The new modem is in a different spot than the previous modem, so maybe this slight difference is what causes the disturbance? Even if I put the laptop right near the PC WLAN antenna, I still have a normal connection with it.

 

I also noticed, that with my old (now dead) laptop I could play Infiltration over WLAN without lag (and it had an old 56Mbps card), with my new PC and the 300Mbps card I have more lag and when sprinting often warp back the the position I started sprinting from (stamina gone though). So, perhaps the problem is indeed with my Linksys WLAN card? It works with my old modem, but not that great and doesn't work with the new modem configuration.

 

Updating drivers is difficult with Linksys, the main page doesnt have anything useful, I found some drivers that I had to manually install from the device manager (no auto installer) and with these drivers the card didn't even work, it only works with the drivers I have on the CD.

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I can't see where the problem lies. I put the PC to the same room as the modem/router, and internet works perfectly, I put it back to the other room and no internet connection (also can't access router). The laptop has normal connection from any room.

Do I understand this correctly. Physically moving the computer nearer to the router/modem solves your problem?

If that is the case, then the most likely problem is that you are not getting a good wireless signal in the room where you have the PC. Changing the location of the router's antennae (and certainly changing the device) can cause drastic differences in the quality of the wireless radio signal you receive in different rooms. Depending on how close you are to your neighbors, you may also be suffering from interference issues.

 

With the previous provider's modem I have connection with any PC/laptop in any room.

 

It doesn't make sense. The new modem is in a different spot than the previous modem, so maybe this slight difference is what causes the disturbance? Even if I put the laptop right near the PC WLAN antenna, I still have a normal connection with it.

The implication here is that the old modem included a "better" radio. The laptop and your WLAN card/radio/antennae are probably more different than you imagine. The laptop may just have a better receiver and antennae setup and be better able to deal with the reduced signal quality.

 

I also noticed, that with my old (now dead) laptop I could play Infiltration over WLAN without lag (and it had an old 56Mbps card), with my new PC and the 300Mbps card I have more lag and when sprinting often warp back the the position I started sprinting from (stamina gone though). So, perhaps the problem is indeed with my Linksys WLAN card? It works with my old modem, but not that great and doesn't work with the new modem configuration.

 

Updating drivers is difficult with Linksys, the main page doesnt have anything useful, I found some drivers that I had to manually install from the device manager (no auto installer) and with these drivers the card didn't even work, it only works with the drivers I have on the CD.

Ok, so I am guessing you went from 802.11g (which is really only ~22Mbps) to some form of 802.11n radio. Running at the higher rates of 802.11n when you do not have line-of-sight between radios can get very tricky very quickly. This will be especially true if your PC only has one "simple" antennae -- FWIW, your laptop almost certainly has at least 2 antennas in it. It may well be the case that the PC and modem are constantly negotiating how to establish a high-speed connection and failing, but not falling back to a lower speed connection due to some incompatibility between them -- all of this 802.11n stuff is a bit of a hack.

 

My suggestion is that if possible you should use the driver/interface software on your PC to force the connection down to being 802.11g or even 802.11b to make sure things are basically working. You should pay attention to whatever signal strength indicator you have and move your antennas around to maximize performance. Then you can try turning on the 802.11n stuff at the PC end and see if things work. If not, you may just be out of luck and not be able to get those "advertised" speeds in your space.

 

Good luck, I hope this helps.

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It came to my mind that I have an USB WLAN lying around somewhere, so I tried it. It has a connection with the new modem, but compared to the old modem the connection is quite bad (the Linksys card has a much better connection to the old modem compared to the USB thing, but no connection to the new modem).

 

So I guess it has to do with the location and that the Linksys reacts individually to it. The new provider uses the cable network for their stuff, not the telephone network as the previous and originally the new modem had to be at a better place, but the tech man said there was no signal, so he had to install it at a different place (directly at the cable amplifier, no idea how it's called) and I guess that's the problem. 14 days after installation aren't over, I think I'll step back from the deal. :hmm:

 

I also thought about using a WLAN antenna with a cable, so I can move it further toward the modem. Will it improve the connection, or are such antennas rather useless?

Also, I have two antennas on the Linksys, is it better to have one double-antenna with a split cable, or right away two separated antennas, which I can position individually?

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There is no simple answer for the antennae questions. It depends on LOTS and LOTS of factors. The only workable suggestion is to try a few different things and see what works better/best for your particular situation. Of course, your neighbors may change their wireless setup or get a new refrigerator and mess things up :)

 

It is good that at least you now know where/what the problem is. Based on your experiment with the USB wireless adapter, it certainly looks like you are getting less signal to your PC location with this new router/modem than you had with the previous device. Using an antenna that has a cable may help (or it may not help much at all). In general getting the antenna up off of the floor and away from walls should improve the signal strength, but again this depends on a lot of factors that are hard to guess.

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Yeah, I thought about using a long cable to get the antenna closer to the stuff, but now I decided I keep my current provider (for now) and the situation changes. I checked the speed and get 10Mbps download speed out of the maximum 16Mbps, I think that's quite not bad, is it? The new provider had 32Mbps for less money! But the location of the hardware killed it. :(

 

As for the antenna, you say it better has a higher position - now the modem is in the room below, approx 15 feet away (so it goes diagonally down). With an antenna I could reduce the distance to 10 feet, wouldn't be better to place the antenna right on the floor? Since it would be nearer it would make the angle less flat that way the ground as obstacle less thick.

I'll get me one cable and experiment, if it shows effect, I get me a second.

 

 

By the way, thanks to you guys again for trying to help.

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15 ft is quite close (even through a floor/wall to have as much trouble and the low bandwidth you have described. I would be surprised that being a few feet closer would make a big difference, but the only way you will know is to try it.

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These kinds of threads remind me how good it was that I set up my network before wireless was common, so now I have wires stuck in all PCs in my house rather than having to deal with wireless network issues.... You may want to just consider that solution, it's a long-lasting one (I think mine is up for almost 10 years) ;)

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Good point Galzohar. I spent my share of sweating, cursing, fussing to get wires pulled in our house, but once they are in there are no problems with them. Is drilling a few nice neat holes really out of the question to go the 15 feet to get from your PC to the cable-modem?

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Beware: 802.11n isnt 300kbps bi-directional anyway in many cases. Buehgler makes a good point about dropping to 802.11g :thumbsup:

 

Elements that can be blocking signal strength are ...ceramic tiled walls, mirrors, concrete, microwave (not just the cooking type) & other radio devices. For example the central heating controller in our home interferes with my wireless mouse sometimes knocking the connection clean out despite moving the channels, so as previously mentioned theres lots that can cause impact.

 

15ft isnt far...you should still be getting a decent signal at 30+ft. Check the router & wless card manual for references.

 

I work cabled to the router but have 6 wireless devices in my home...all works ok...but Im not gaming where a lot of datapackets at large sizes are constantly being swapped. Test the router cabled as mentioned.....if theres stil poor performance...contact your ISP.

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Even if you can't permanently run a Cat 5 or Cat 6 cable through the walls, you can always do like I did in my apartment. I ran Cat 5 cable along the ceiling into my bedroom so I can hook my laptop up to the network.They do make a special staple gun that uses round staples just for that purpose though you could use the nailed variety of cable clips and it would work just fine. I don't have to worry about the door as I never close it, but you can run it down the side of the door trim and under the door so it does not get pinched.

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I got a different modem from the provider and it happened at the same time I changed the laminate floor in the room with the computer (higher quality isolation under the laminate). Now the WLAN connection is not as good as it was before and I don't know whether it is the new modem or the laminate isolation, maybe both. I had to put the PC much further into the room to get a connection at all, so I need an antenna with a cable (LAN wire to that room is not an option yet, I think about it, but for now a WLAN antenna with a cable should do it).

I have the option of a 5dBi and an 8dBi antenna. Is 8dBi so much better? Because I have two antenna ports on my card, I could have 2x 5dBi for the same price as the one 8dBi, but if 8dBi is so much better I could go for 2x 8dBi.

 

And to my never ending story (RAM issue): I tested both ram sticks separately, the first showed no problems for 3 weeks of use, the second gave me instant blue screens and application errors. I run that test two times though, second time the first stick showed no problems once again, the second one worked relatively ok this time, but I noticed application errors and other problems (sometimes PC couldn't boot from the first time) and later had blue screens a couple of times. I tried them both again and had issues. Now I run the first ram stick again and as always no problems (at all).

Am I save to say that the first ram is good and the second one is bad? How must I approach the manufacturer now to get a replacement?

 

I'd appreciate your wisdom this time again. :D

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Ref Ram.... explain everything as tested to the RAM supplier & see if its still under any warranty if so they should exchange it.....but I obviously cant vouch for them....just tell em..its been a cause of faults since day 1 & its taken this long to find that cause.

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Will do.

 

Regarding the antenna. Guys, does a 8dBi antenna does really much than a 5dBi? Would you suggest to use the 8dBi?

As I explained I have two antenna ports on my WLAN card, I plan to use two antennas, so I can place them at different spots to have more coverage. Would that make sense? As I know laptops have an antenna wire around the display and I had quite a good WLAN connection with my old laptop.

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I called the supplier and he says for the RAM sticks to be send in for replacement, both. That will make my PC unusable for more than 1 week. So I thought to get me a 2GB stick before I send the other RAM away. My question is; will in the future the 6GB be used by win7 64bit (home premium)? Or can it only be 4GB, 8GB? I know it requires a pair of RAM for dual-channeling, but if I use 3 RAM sticks, will the pair still be dual-channel and the single additional power, or will that switch off the dual-channel thing (which would be bad I guess)?

 

Edit: Or would it be better to get 2x1GB so these, alongside with the 2x2GB, would give me 6GB dual-channel?

From what I know for optimal dual-channeling you need a pair of equal RAM (same model), but that doesn't apply for a second pair, doesn't it?

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