Brettzies

Fan Funded Game Development

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Saw this a couple days ago and thought it related to BFS a bit. In a few days, they've already a massed over $1.3 million dollars. Granted, they are an established studio with a pretty loyal fanbase of their old titles(even from LucasArts) so it isn't too big of a stretch. It would be sweet to see BFS have this kind of community backing...or do they?

 

Double Fine - Fan funded Adventure Game

Founded in 2000 by industry veteran Tim Schafer (Day of the Tentacle, Full Throttle, Grim Fandango), the San Francisco-based company has established itself as a unique creative force with critically-acclaimed titles such as Pyschonauts, Brutal Legend, Costume Quest, Stacking, Iron Brigade, Once Upon a Monster, and Double Fine Happy Action Theater. This year, you'll be given a front-row seat as they revisit Tim's design roots and create a brand-new, downloadable "Point-and-Click" graphic adventure game for the modern age.

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I am not sure. We did have the donators like myself that donated to John to help cover some expenses, but that was stopped some time ago. I still would like to donate more to help John realize his, and our dream, of a Tac-Sim we all want. Still, at this time, I don't think there is enough interest from outside the community that is still here to do something like that until or if John were to release something, even as a demo.

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It's hard to pour money into a studio that hasn't produced any titles yet. Like you say, it's much more easier if you have all these previous products.

 

Although I do like those kick-starter projects which sometimes get nice attention at sites like RockPaperShotgun and they suddenly get tens and thousands of dollars. I think it works something like this: you put down a funding deadline and if you don't meet the project goal (amount of donated $) before the deadline everyone gets his money back or something like that. If you do make the goal the money is yours and you can develop your product with some serious $$

 

I think such a kick start project could be some serious breakthrough for BFS if you present yourself in the right way. I bet at least 50% of all the R6 en GR veterans are willing to back such a project (if you can find them of course). As long as the project seems credible and doable. First selling point is that John S has worked on the old school tac titles at RSE of course :) Backers who donate for example $30+ get 50% discount on game, backers who donate $70 get the game when released + whatever, backers who donate $150+ get soundtrack goodies etc etc.

 

If you donate $1000+ you weren't there when it didn't happen.

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I love this idea.

 

Investors dont need actual earnings returned to them. I'd give $25 just for an early copy. That is who a lot of these products works on Kickstarter.

 

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I have looked at KickStarter a few times and it might very well be the way I decide to go eventually. It's all in the presentation and exposure so I would want to make sure I have a playable demo that shows the basics done before embarking on such an adventure. I don't have the clout to simply put up a good idea (even with my track record) and get any amount of decent funding.

 

I have a sneaking suspicion though that once something that shows the core mechanics and vision is playable, things will become a lot easier. Just need to get to that point.

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the fact a lot of the game is already in development is great selling point as well.

 

 

True, but I think it would take something tangible to generate any significant amount of money.

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I have a sneaking suspicion though that once something that shows the core mechanics and vision is playable, things will become a lot easier. Just need to get to that point.

Definitely. I think your background and track record will help in any "presentation" video you do if you decided to do a kickstarter thing at some point. Feels like something that could eventually help with this type of production.

 

It does seem a bit odd to me the low number Double Fine wanted and that no publisher would offer that up. Just seems like someone would pony up $400k given the people involved. On the other hand, I think it's really cool the community is willing to pay before they play. It will be awesome to see BFS reach this point.

Edited by Brettzies

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Definitely. I think your background and track record will help in any "presentation" video you do if you decided to do a kickstarter thing at some point. Feels like something that could eventually help with this type of production.

 

It does seem a bit odd to me the low number Double Fine wanted and that no publisher would offer that up. Just seems like someone would pony up $400k given the people involved. On the other hand, I think it's really cool the community is willing to pay before they play. It will be awesome to see BFS reach this point.

 

 

the problem the publishers look at when funding smaller projects is that they look at what already sells extremely well, (Ie. the "AAA" lame brain action-shooter market) and then look at these little projects which are unique and hard to predict return wise and avoid them for more predictable investment returns even though they cost about 3-4x the costs.

 

Example Double Fine's Pyschonaughts which was heralded around the gaming review sites universally but did extremely poorly sales wise despite its great reviews, it was a very difficult game to market to players...

 

A great game that I picked up recently Gotham City Impostors for 14.99 (has some issues on the PC side with them integrating GFWL and Steam) Its surprisingly deep even though it takes a few things off of COD's leveling system... I've had more fun for 14.99 in Gotham City Impostors then I've ever had on 3 Call of Duty titles combined its alot like Shadowrun without the crappy inaccurate guns designed to spare the Console players from PC players as there is no cross platform gaming.

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Seems the days of the Mega Conglomerate Publishers are numbered due to their own greed and lack of developing innovative games.

 

which is both invigorating and a turn for the better.

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I'm just waiting to see what happens when one of these "mainstream" crowd-funded products doesn't live up to expectations though. Will there be a fan revolt?

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Just to be clear... He and I are just having a conversation about what is is what is all. I didn't want it to sound like we were "working something out". :unsure:

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It's a shame you both can't utilise all the students finishing or nearly finished their gaming degrees who are coming out to a decimated economy. I personally know of 5 guys who can't get sustained work here in Ireland. I even joined a team of Irish freelance developers trying to make their own game. Shame that the guy running it was such a dick.

 

Even some of the people from the UDK/Cryengine communities are amazing at what they do. It takes time to learn the engines but you can get amazing results from novices with time. I am by no means the best at environments or modelling but with the help of some community and my own custom models even I could get a map of this quality done in 2/3 months working part time ( working after my girlfriend goes to bed ).

 

 

 

Note even this is an early build, it looks much better now. Just got the hang of voxel sculpting to produce some nice caves. My question is, is there any way to utilise people who are great in the relevant communities to help make your games reality?

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